15/
10/
13

The Little Bag That Could

In the last few years, more and more start-up companies have been using art fusion to catapult themselves into category ‘players.‘ A great example is The Cambridge Satchel Company. The start-up fashion brand with one inexpensive bag design became a fashion media darling seemingly overnight. One of their first collaborations was with Japanese fashion label Comme des Garçons, making a series of fluorescent satchel bags into a multi-million pound phenomenon. Instantly.

Learning from their victory, The Cambridge Satchel Company continued with an even bolder approach, collaborating with celebrated textile design visionaries, Basso & Brooke on a line of limited edition satchel bags for the London fashion week in 2012. The limited-edition run of 100 B&B Cambridge Satchel Bags, priced well above the fluorescent series, were sold out immediately and cemented The Cambridge Satchel Company’s reputation as ‘it’ bag makers.

Currently, fashion brands are the most comfortable with using art fusion to their advantage, mainly because the movement was born in the fashion world. But does the theory work for products as mundane as dish soap or as mechanical as cars? Stay tuned for the next post.

CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x COMME DES GARçONS
CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x SUPREMEBEING
CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x CHRISTOPHER SHANNON
CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x CHRISTOPHER SHANNON
THE CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x BASSO & BROOKE
THE CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x BASSO & BROOKE
THE CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x COMME DES GARÇONS
THE CAMBRIDGE SATCHEL COMPANY x COMME DES GARÇONS

20/
09/
13

Art Creating Brands – Brands Creating Culture

While art is being made, curated, exhibited, and collected, products are being developed, manufactured, marketed and sold. But more and more often, the word “curated” is being interjected from the world of art into the world of mass-production and mass-consumption.

While the word is borrowed, curation is no less a technique of marketing and selling in the contemporary art scene than it is in the world of brands. The two worlds are learning from each other and co-mingling more than ever before. Take for example, the plethora of artist/brand collaborations that have been captivating the marketplace in recent years. The effect, as we’ve seen, can be nothing short of spectacular. We would argue that the best of these examples will be regarded historically as an art movement of our time. To recognize this and to be a part of it, fascinates and excites us to no end.

So what exactly is this movement that is blurring the lines between art and brand? We call it art fusion. It is when an artist of any kind (painter, filmmaker, designer, printmaker, musician, graffiti artist, etc.) collaborates with a brand of any kind (product, service, retail store, charity, etc.) to create a cultural artifact (a product, sculpture, mural, film, etc.) for the benefit of both. As consumers, we’ve already seen many examples and can expect to see many more as different kinds of brands dip their toes in the waters and more artists get involved.

One of the most successful art fusion collaborations was between Louis Vuitton and Yayoi Kusama in 2012. Not only did it create incredible talk-value and welcome a whole new customer base for the brand, it catapulted the artist to top-of-mind awareness in circles she was not well known. The caché of both parties rubbed off on and worked well for each other. But does it have to be a well-established, high-end brand and a high-level artist for art fusion to work? Stay tuned for next post.

YAYOI KUSAMA’S x LOUIS VUITTON
YAYOI KUSAMA’S PUMPKIN
YAYOI KUSAMA’S x LOUIS VUITTON
YAYOI KUSAMA’S PUMPKIN
LI XIAOFENG x LACOSTE
LI XIAOFENG x LACOSTE